Demo Image

The Life

SF State Professors provide students with holistic health methods to destress during the school year.

Demo Image

The Chomp

Our staff writer, Ivane Lund-Soyombo, takes a mystical and stomach filling trip to the most popular late-night fast food joints in SF.

Demo Image

The Spin

A look into hip-hop's past, present, and future.

Demo Image

The Dirty

XPress writer Jourdon Ahn opens up a new doorway to sexuality

Demo Image

The Stitch

Trend report: SFSU students play with patterns

Demo Image

The Wire

The newest iPhones could be the end of the beginning or the beginning of the end

Demo Image

The Score

Baseball season is almost back, and writer Jessica Mendoza welcomes it back--die-hard fans included.

Demo Image

The Buzz

Bombed your Underwater Basket Weaving test? Five tropical drinks sure to cure those first exam woes

Noise Pop Preview

By Xpress Mag Staff

Noisepop

Written by Nadine Quitania
Photo courtesy of Matt Kowal-Noise Pop 2009

San Francisco’s annual Noise Pop indie music, film, and art festival is just around the corner. The week-long festival, held in over twenty venues in the Bay Area, with the heart of its operation is at The NWBLK (a store, design fabrication facility, and official Noise Pop Headquarters—NPHQ) is an event that shouldn’t be missed.

Aw man, everything’s happening at the same time! No worries, here’s a breakdown of who and what you should see:

Start off at the official opening night party on Tuesday, February 25, at The NWBLK with DJ sets by Bob Mould, Shepard Fairey, and Jello Biafra. After some fun at the opening night party, if you were one of the lucky ones who scored tickets, head over to The Fillmore and catch Lord Huron and the Superhumanoids. It’s sold out but if you really want to see the band, buy a badge and see not only them, but all the other sold out shows and events throughout the week.

On Wednesday, if you’re skipping the movie or don’t get in to watch Mistaken For Strangers at the Roxie Theater and are into surf-pop, take your pick and see the The Donkeys with Papercuts, Vetiver, and EDJ (Eric D. Johnson of the Fruit Bats) at the Chapel or San Francisco treasures the Fresh & Onlys, Cool Ghouls, Sandy’s, and Luke Sweeney at Brick & Mortar Music Hall.

So much is happening on Thursday night but we all have to make sacrifices and we’re still going to have a blast. Here’s what’s going down: first, go to the Noise Pop Poster Retrospective at Bender’s, after that head over to the NPHQ and take advantage of the Noise Pop Badge Appreciation Happy Hour.  End the night at Rickshaw Stop to see Broods and ASTR. But hey, if you don’t have a badge, or aren’t into Broods and have been waiting for some hip-hop or rap, go to Slim’s and see Shabazz Palaces, Cities Aviv, Extra Classic, and Raw-G for the goods.

Still haven’t had enough and you want to go out and party some more on Friday? Or you missed out all week and finally have time to do something? There are free shows to enjoy. The Scene Unseen III event with Mr. Carmack, Kelela, Majical Cloudz, Supreme Cuts, and Purple at 1015 Folsom is one party you definitely want in on. That’s a whole lotta goodness going down under one roof and it’s free with an RSVP via the Noise Pop website.

Tired from Friday and just want a steady night out on Saturday? Catch Real Estate, The Shilohs, and Dominant Legs at The Independent. If you want to dance, head over to the NWBLK and party with Ladytron (DJ set) and Jimmy Tamborello (The Postal Service, DNTL). Get things started early on Sunday and see Rogue Wave with Trails and Ways at the Chapel before the closing night party with Machinedrum (club set) and DJ Dials back at the NPHQ.

Get Your Art On

Noise Pop is throwin’ it back this year showcasing posters and photos from its previous years. If you’re a fan of poster art and collect, be sure to go to the Noise Pop Poster Retrospective and pick up a poster at Bender’s on Thursday with artists Lil’ Tuffy, Alan Forbes, Jason Munn, Matt Leunig, and Gregg Gordon. You’re into photography? Stop by San FranPsycho and see the “Women Who Rock” Photography Show on Friday. Don’t forget to bring a light colored shirt and get a limited edition San FranPsycho print done. On Saturday, Yours Truly is having an exhibition of photos, videos, and letters that haven’t been released before and if you’re a fan of those intimate Yours Truly videos of your favorite artists be sure to stop by the NPHQ for that.

Short list of films to see:

Our Vinyl Weighs a Ton at The NWBLK on February 26 (Q&A with Director Jeff Broadway and Stones Throw Co-founder Peanut Butter Wolf) and a second screening at Artists’ Television Access on March 2.

Mistaken for Strangers at The Roxie Theater (Q&A with Director Tom Berninger)

Cidade Cinza/Grey City at The NWBLK

Kids Like You and Me at The NWBLK (Q&A with Director Bill Cody)

And finally, you know how sometimes you get into a band and look them up only to find out they just played a show in the city? Well, here’s your chance to get ahead. We went through the lineup and put together a playlist of this year’s artists just for you. Listen, fall in love, and catch a show before some of them go off on tour and head to Austin for SXSW next month.

SF Staples: Dignified Dirty Dogs

By Xpress Mag Staff

By Nicole Dobarro

It’s 3 a.m. and it’s been a long night of inhaling cheap whiskey, tolerating the hoots, hollers, and enduring the judgement of walking barefoot in the Mission because those heels just aren’t worth it. It’s time to go home. But wait…Can it be? That seducing aroma of greasy, grilled meat fills the air as 19th and Mission Streets approach. As if a divine intervention has grasped you and cuddled you into a warm, fuzzy place. You have found the dirty dog cart and nothing has been, or ever will be, more perfect.

Rumored to have originated in Mexico then made popular in Los Angeles, the blessed dirty dog or danger dog (or street dog or Mission dog) has saved us San Franciscans. More often than not the dirty dog rescues us from ridiculous lines at Taqueria Cancun or having to wait for the OWL next to that guy being that guy. And from experience, Lyft drivers will more often let you eat your incredibly messy dirty dog in their car over that burrito because they know what’s up. Living in a society where Americans spend over $1.5 billion on hot dogs (only in grocery stores) last year, it’s safe to say the hot dog holds a place very close to our hearts. Even with the rise of the organic and local movement, according to the National Hot Dog & Sausage Council, hot dog sales have actually remained the same. Maybe it’s because of the growth of more health-conscious hot dog brands or maybe it’s because we’re simply addicted to them.

Though eating two to three dirty dogs while squatting on the curb can be incredibly thrilling, why not try it at home where you hopefully have plates and a chair? Cooking at home creates the opportunity to make a dirty dog tastier and dare I say it? Healthier. Bacon-wrapped hot dogs are not supposed to be healthy, but when you’re paying four to five bucks (depending on the hour) you just know the quality can’t be that great. This recipe doesn’t call for any specific brand of hot dogs or bacon. Just be aware of what percent of real beef the dogs are made of and reach within your budget. As for produce, buying local and organic is great but anything you can find at Trader Joe’s will work just as well. And don’t be afraid of baking your own bread! It’s surprisingly so easy that it’s silly to buy those rubbery buns that probably also have yoga mat in them.
Making your own dirty dog is a great excuse to show-off to your friends or justify eating five in one sitting, so good luck and happy munching!

Homemade Crusty Hot Dog Buns
(yields about 8 buns)3.5 C all purpose flour
1 C warm water
1/3 C oil
1/3 C sugar
1 yeast packet
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg
pat of melted butter
crushed almonds
sea salt
sesame seeds
fennel seeds

1. Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees.
2. Combine and mix warm water, oil, sugar, salt and yeast packet. Forget about it for 15 minutes.
3. Beat egg and set aside.
4. After 15 minutes, slowly pour yeast mixture and egg to flour in a large bowl. Mix until well combined.
5. Transfer dough to a surface lightly covered in flour. Knead for 2-3 minutes until bumps disappear.
6. Portion dough into 8 even pieces.
7. Roll into logs(try to resemble the shape of hot dog buns).
8. Place on parchment paper or a greased baking sheet. Brush melted butter on tops of logs and sprinkle with crushed almonds, sea salt, sesame seeds and fennel seeds.
9. Bake for 20-25 minutes.

100% all-beef hot dogs
thick cut bacon
baby bell peppers
onion
pickled jalapenos
kewpie mayo

While the buns are in the oven, prepare the hot dog and toppings:
1. Heat up a greased grill pan. If you don’t have one, a regular pan is fine. If you want that extra crunch, heat up the deep-fryer. YOLO.
2. Wrap the hot dogs with bacon and grill all sides until the bacon is cooked and a nice charred appearance. Remove from grill pan and set aside.
3. Cut 4-8 baby bell peppers and one onion into strips. Grill them until nicely charred on grill pan. Be sure to use the oil released from the hot dogs to cook the veggies.
4. Slice homemade hot dog buns then get to assembling! First goes the bacon-wrapped hot dog, grilled onions and peppers, then top with pickled jalapenos and kewpie mayo if you want to go all out. Then don’t share and enjoy!

**Recipe adapted from Joy the Baker and Bonnie’s 30-Minute Hot Dog Buns, and through trial and error.

Between The Sheets

By Xpress Mag Staff

Screen Shot 2014-02-14 at 4.08.32 PM
Written by Jourdon Ahn

Welcome to a new kind of sex column, where we believe in a safe space for (a)sexuality that encompasses all peoples and their beautiful pussies and penises.

I’m seeking to accurately reflect the diversity seen everyday on the bus, at school, work, or on the street. Between the Sheets is an attempt to provoke knowledge, share experiences, affirm sexualities, create conversation, and perhaps alleviate horny curiosities.

This isn’t your mother’s sex column. It’s just as much for straight males and females, as it is your gay roommate, queer professor, transgender coworker, non-binary classmate—it’s for us all.

Maira McDermott, a gender studies major at SF State, agrees that “We live in an incredibly fluid society, especially in San Francisco and at SFSU. Our student body is so full of variance in sexual orientations, genders, and political views, that I think having a different kind of sex blog would be eye opening, or at least more comfortable for a large population.”

Now maybe you’re wondering who I am, the voice inside the font, and why I’m the author of this column. It could be because I’m a pansexual cis female or because I’ve got a lot of opinions. But, mainly it’s because I seek out this kind of discourse in order to understand myself, feel natural and find empowerment, just like many of you.

Our culture is both sex-negative (or sex-critical) and sex-positive, and most people fall into one category, though there is a gray area. Neither identifier is the good or bad choice; it’s simply a difference.

Brooke Glasky, Director of the ASI’s Women’s Center identifies as a sexually empowered and positive woman because to her, “being able to not only have the freedom and right to be sexually empowered, but also gifted in the sense of being able to say no, is something [she] personally cherishes everyday.”

Sex-negativity expresses a different sentiment. Olivia Mendez, a heterosexual, cis-female student explained, “I don’t always find sex empowering and don’t think it has to be. I think the implications of sex-positivity are one’s that do not include room for people that have suffered sexual trauma or are questioning their own sexuality.”

McDermott acknowledges the gray area though she identifies more with sex-negativity, “This is not to say that sex is not wonderful, however, a lot of sex-positivity that I’ve seen has been problematic…it ignores survivors of sexual assault, imposes compulsory sexuality, and ignores trans individuals. Sex-negativity doesn’t necessarily cover these aspects, but it at least feels more critical and inclusive.”

Although most like to believe that sex is inherently private—it’s not. Sex- positivity, negativity, and the gray area are only pieces to the neverending stimulation of sex, so let’s talk about it.

If you want to share experiences, suggest topics, critique, flirt, or cry—tell me more at sfsubetweenmysheets@gmail.com.

John Franco marks his bingo card after his number is called at The Riptide located at 3639 Taraval St. between 46th and 47th avenues, Saturday Sept. 10, 2013. The Riptide hosts bingo night every saturday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. with a final round grand prize of a $50 bar tab.  Photo By Tony Santos / Xpress

Alternative Ways To Get Wasted

By Erika Maldonado

John Franco marks his bingo card after his number is called at The Riptide located at 3639 Taraval St. between 46th and 47th avenues, Saturday Sept. 10, 2013. The Riptide hosts bingo night every saturday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. with a final round grand prize of a $50 bar tab.  Photo By Tony Santos / Xpress

John Franco marks his bingo card after his number is called at The Riptide located at 3639 Taraval St. between 46th and 47th avenues. The Riptide hosts bingo night every saturday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. with a final round grand prize of a $50 bar tab. Photo By Tony Santos / Xpress

Alcohol makes pretty much any situation better. While bar-hopping and some dance therapy can help take the edge off, new and exciting ways to get your drink on works wonders.  Bar trivia nights are great, but these affordable events around the city are fresh ideas for a perfect date, a night out with the crew, or for meeting new people.

Screen Shot 2014-02-21 at 4.49.17 PM

Jumping off the bandwagon

By Xpress Mag Staff

Screen Shot 2014-02-21 at 4.49.17 PM
Written by Jessica Mendoza

Now that baseball season is just around the corner, Giants fans are preparing themselves for another exciting season by sporting their Giants gear and rushing the ticket booths for the best seats possible.

On February 1, 2014,  AT&T Park swarmed with attendees of the twenty-first annual Giants FanFest to the point that the entrance to the fields was clogged for a long period of time. Fans spent over an hour in autograph lines just to meet their favorite player.

Where do all the Giants fans come from?

The Giants are coming off a horrific season. They finished the year nineteenth in the league and could not defend their previous title as World Champions. As a Giants fan, it was heartbreaking.

More and more people show up to Giants games than ever before. According to ESPN’s Major League Baseball attendance status report, the Giants are in the top five for most sold-out games over the last three years.

After the Giants won their first World Series title (since moving to San Francisco) in 2010, everywhere you went, someone was wearing a Giants jacket or baseball cap.

The bigger the fan base for any sports team usually means more sold out games, giving the team more morale. Right?

Many people started watching the Giants play only when they were winning, especially after their World Series championship.  However, long-time Giants fans are not very pleased with the many people jumping on the bandwagon.

Characteristics of bandwagon fans include only showing up to games when a team faces their rival, attending more games than usual when the team has a winning record, and not paying attention to the team during offseason and spring training.

“I can spot a band wagon fan by the way they dress such as going to a game with, or having on those foam fingers and wearing them during the game,” explains Marc Miranda Jr, a physical therapy major at San Francisco State.

Miranda and his parents are season ticket holders and have been attending games since the Giants played at Candlestick Park.

“Those casual fans might scoop up tickets to go to games, but then sit on their phones or talk non-stop to their neighbors or leave in the fourth inning if the home team isn’t winning,” Chelena Goldman, a sports writer for SFBay, says.

But what makes a true Giants fan? Are true fans required to have loved the Giants since birth? Do they have to attend every game throughout the season? Must they splurge on Giants gear?

Many die-hard Giants fans believe bandwagon fans are not in tune with the team at the same level as the most devoted. They think fans should watch the games both on and off the screen. Die-hard fans will watch the local sports channel for highlights and interviews and stick by the Giants during a winning or losing season.

I personally think a true baseball fan is someone who loves the game of baseball. Whether it be someone who has been a long-time fan born into a family of Giants fans like Miranda, or someone who has just jumped on the bandwagon.  If you love the game, you’re a fan.

Cocktails With a Kick: Winter Sour

By Xpress Mag Staff

Written by Dani Hutton

Elixir–Winter Sour–$11

Have you ever wondered what a Christmas tree tastes like? No, probably not. But, in the event that you’re curious now, it tastes like rosemary. Or vice-versa. It’s not unpleasant, but it’s certainly unusual if you’re not used to it. Despite the interesting element of rosemary oil within Elixir’s Winter Sour, it’s not what makes this drink special. No, that’s the egg whites.

Overall, the Winter Sour isn’t an overly complicated drink on an ingredient level. There are four ingredients: Campari, a type of potable bitters, Meyer lemon juice, egg whites, and rosemary. Muddle the rosemary, juice the lemon, strain the egg white, add the liqueur, shake, serve, and garnish. Seems like a combination that would result in a simple beverage, right?

Wrong. From the first sip, the drink is interesting, although whether it’s in a positive or negative manner, that’s up to your interpretation. The rosemary and Meyer lemon play off of each other heavily, nearly overpowering the other two ingredients. Despite that, the Campari makes an appearance, working with the with the Meyer lemon to add a sweetness that works to make the rosemary less overwhelming.

The egg white does nothing for the taste, but it’s an interesting addition because of what it does to the drink. Once shaken and poured, the egg white forms a frothy head that adds a fizzy layer, which makes the rest of the flavors pop in your mouth for an intense, if not particularly booze-laden experience.

Student by day, Erika Maldonado moonlights as a Lyft driver in the City by the Bay. Photo by John Ornelas / Xpress

Tales of a Lyft Driver

By Erika Maldonado

Student by day, Erika Maldonado moonlights as a Lyft driver in the City by the Bay. Photo by John Ornelas / Xpress

Student by day, Erika Maldonado moonlights as a Lyft driver in the City by the Bay. Photo by John Ornelas / Xpress

While weekend warriors are out on the town, I’m the one they call when they need a lift.  Most people know it as ride sharing, but the California Public Utilities Commission has officially dubbed app-based ride services Transportation Network Companies, TNCs. Companies like Sidecar and Uber have been making headlines and pissing off taxi drivers for more than a year now. I, however, decided to join the pink moustached fleet known as Lyft about a month ago.

My first passenger was a disgruntled, older woman who was impatient because it took me a whole ten minutes to get to her. I’ve quickly learned working later at night is usually more fun. Drunk people aren’t in a rush to get anywhere and they’re generally in better spirits.  A group of Academy of Art students I picked up even offered to get me a drink at the bar I was taking them to after I told them it was my first night on the job. It was a sweet gesture, but I of course declined.

Drunk passengers can also be challenging. To say the least. My last passengers of the night were two very inebriated women in search of an iPhone that was stolen earlier in the night. I picked them up at a beautiful apartment atop a hill with such a gorgeous view of the city that it reminded me why I pay ridiculous rent to live in a box.

“We’re on a mission. Do you think you can help us out?”

The mission I foolishly accepted involved driving these two petite women who couldn’t have been older than 21 years old to the Tenderloin around 1 a.m. to an address that their Find My iPhone app directed them to. The one whose phone they were trying to track down was the drunker of the two, not surprising.  Twice, she opened her passenger door when I was in motion, frantic because she “NEEDED HER PHONE!”

By the time we got to the location, I was ready to leave these two defenseless young’ns on their own in the T.L. in the middle of the night.

“Do you think you can wait for us for a bit?”

My Christian upbringing forced me to oblige. The app led them to apartment buildings, making it nearly impossible to track down the phone. I gave them five minutes, which is about how long it took these two to realize it was a lost cause.  What did they think was going to happen when they got there anyway? Were they going to ask the thief to please return the phone? It was a doomed mission from the start and I was dumb enough to be an accomplice. I ended up just taking them back to their gorgeous apartment and decided I had enough for my first night on the job.

Considering that I spent three years as a Starbucks barista, being a Lyft driver isn’t the worst job. If you drive during peak hours you keep all the money you make without Lyft taking 15 percent of it. In three hours I can make up to $150 and I can work whenever I want. All I have to do is make sure my car is clean and flip my app to “driver mode.” The decision came partially after feeling safer about regulations put in place for TNCs by the CPUC this past September. And partially because I, like many unfortunate college students, am not getting paid a dime for the 16 hours I put in each week at the news organization I’m interning for.

It isn’t fair for taxi drivers who have have to shell out extra money for permits, have city limitations on fares they can charge and have a separate driver’s license, as mentioned in an earlier Xpress story on Lyft. But working for free when you’re living in a city with one of the most expensive costs of living isn’t fair either.

Catching Crabs

By Xpress Mag Staff

Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, shows the difference between a Dungeness crab i(left) and a rock crab (right) in his backyard on the first day of the recreational season, Nov. 2, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, shows the difference between a Dungeness crab i(left) and a rock crab (right) in his backyard on the first day of the recreational season, Nov. 2, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

Words and photos by Tony Santos

Braving the open sea, wrangling wild animals from the depths of the ocean, and taking the kill home to feast upon the meat.

Ok, it’s no Deadliest Catch, but Daniel Hoffman is regularly enjoying fresh Dungeness crab, caught from the comfort of his kayak.

Every few weeks Hoffman, a biology major at SF State who lives a few minutes drive from Baker Beach, loads his kayak into a pickup truck and heads out to make good on what the San Francisco Bay has to offer.

About two years ago Hoffman started kayak crabbing, adding to the other water-related activities he enjoys. He says crabs are abundant in San Francisco and come in shallow waters to spawn, making them an easy catch.

After sending out his nets and waiting a few minutes in the kayak, Hoffman has his first crab, and continues until he’s satisfied. Pulling in the final net, Hoffman paddles in, packs up, and heads home to unload his equipment and catch.

Arriving home, its time for Hoffman to finish the job.  He boils a pot of water with table salt, measuring only with his eyes, and drops in the sweet crustaceans. Once the crabs are done cooking, they must be cleaned.

Hoffman begins by separating the telson—the pointy-triangle on the bottom—from under the abdomen, allowing the body to be detached from the shell. He then removes the gills and guts from the body, leaving legs, claws and torso meat.

A relaxing day on the water, followed by a meal fit for kings—not bad for a day in the life of a student.

Bon appétit!

  • Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, carries his kayak through is backdoor to load it in his truck. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, carries his kayak through is backdoor to load it in his truck. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

  • Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, untangles the ropes for his nets before crabbing at Baker Beach Oct. 30, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, untangles the ropes for his nets before crabbing at Baker Beach Oct. 30, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

  • Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, pulls up a crab net at Baker Beach, Oct. 30, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    Daniel Hoffman, senior biology major, pulls up a crab net at Baker Beach, Oct. 30, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

  • The California Department of Fish and Wildlife requires that Dungeness crab be a minimum five and three quarters of an inch on the widest part of the carapace—the second notch of the shell—in order to be legal. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    The California Department of Fish and Wildlife requires that Dungeness crab be a minimum five and three quarters of an inch on the widest part of the carapace—the second notch of the shell—in order to be legal for catching. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

  • To trap the crabs, Hoffman uses nets, similar to basketball nets, that have a smaller, webbed rim on the bottom. When the net hits the ocean floor, the larger top rim collapses flat over the bottom, so crabs can crawl onto the net to nibble on the bait. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    To trap the crabs, Hoffman uses nets, similar to basketball nets, that have a smaller, webbed rim on the bottom. When the net hits the ocean floor, the larger top rim collapses flat over the bottom, so crabs can crawl onto the net to nibble on the bait. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

  • Hoffman lights his portable stove to boil crabs in his backyard on the first day of the recreational season, Nov. 2, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    Hoffman lights his portable stove to boil crabs in his backyard on the first day of the recreational season, Nov. 2, 2013. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

  • Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

  • Hoffman cleaning the crab he caught earlier. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

    Hoffman cleaning the crab he caught earlier. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

creative-commons-wiki

The odd one out:An exploration of social normalities

By Xpress Mag Staff

creative-commons-wiki

Written by Anais Fuentes
Photo courtesy of creativecommons.org

Why is it that we get so uncomfortable when seeing other people act unusually? Two words—social normalities.

Dr. Eve Shapiro, sociology lecturer at SF State, says social norms are rules or expectations for people in society. These embedded norms can range from beliefs, behaviors, attitudes, or appearances. The few people who don’t follow the masses are deemed strange or socially awkward.

There are three different types of social norms—folkways, mores and laws—explains Dr. Shapiro.  Folkways are the norms for everyday behaviors that people follow for the sake of tradition or convenience, while mores are strict norms that control moral and ethical behavior. The third type of norm is a law, the rules or expectations that have the power of the state behind them.

“All of these minute guidelines for behavior seem completely invisible because they feel like it’s just how you do things,” Dr. Shapiro says. “You can only really see them and see the structure of the social world when they are violated.”

I decided to conduct a little social experiment of my own and willingly defied a social norm while in a public setting to see what kinds of reactions I would provoke in people.  I headed out to Mission Street, an area known for being heavily populated. Not going to lie, I was not very eager about going through with the experiment, but I built up the courage, turned around, and started walking backwards.

First off, walking backwards was not an easy task. Trying to avoid running into people while walking backwards is nearly impossible. Every few seconds I had to turn my head back to see who or what was coming my way, but after a while I became an accomplished backwards walker.

To my surprise, as I walked backwards most people seemed to act completely normal, as if walking backward was standard. So I kept on going and the longer I walked backwards, the more awkward stares I received. One guy even yelled out, “Hey, what are you doing?” and I continued walking.

This social experiment, as abstract as it was, gave me an insight into how people react to the abnormal. We conform because it is how we have learned to relate to one another. We learn and grow by recognizing what is acceptable in our particular society.

So next Monday when you drag yourself out of bed and go to your morning class, keep in mind the taken for granted expectations that we are so used to and remember how these norms really do dictate our decisions and actions.

Faces of SF State

By Xpress Mag Staff

Written by Mariana Barrera
Photos by Rebekah Didlake

From pizza lovers to commuter-students, meet the spectrum of people that roam our campus.

  • 12515124684_922f2fde33_z

  • 12514819793_f4d1a181a8_z

  • 12514699465_c3ff4ce815_z

  • 12515161444_3a5887341d_z

  • 12514802933_ea4b936d4c_z

  • 12515145424_024ce66c3f_z

  • 12514788133_37f93a1975_z

  • 12515131104_4985143815_z

  • 12514757963_d417e8c77a_z

  • 12514633555_3b5c70e2e9_z

  • 12515096314_0595ca5cd5_z

  • Beril Bosnalier, 23, International Relations

    What is the biggest difference you've seen between Turkey and San Francisco?
    "I’m used to seeing animals on the street, but here there are people on the street. That’s the biggest difference."
  • Danny Posadas, 21, Biology

    Why did you decide to study at SF State?
    "I live here, I grew up in San Francisco and I didn’t want to move. I’d be a little home sick and it’s just easier, I don’t have to pay for boarding."
  • Brian Smyth, Marketing

    Have you found anything cool while exploring the city?
    "The Mission District. Me and my friends walked up and down it and at the very end almost towards the excelsior we found a really cool record store, and that was probably the coolest part of the exploration."

    "I’ve never been photographed before, I don’t know what to do. Should I include the pizza? Pizza is tight."
  • Gibran Leon, 23, Criminal Justice

    "There’s a school magazine?"
  • Emerald Wisner-Johnson, Criminal Justice

    "It’s a big move coming up here to Northern California, being from SoCal it’s not bad or anything. People are different, but I’m open to change and everything."

    Do you feel like you’ve changed since you moved out here?
    "I haven’t changed one bit. I’m still trying to find my niche here. I don’t think i’ve changed and it hasn’t changed me."
  • Shahne Belveal, 23, Geography

    What is your biggest struggle at the moment?
    "Dealing with transportation and not living walking distance. I have a car ­and its a drain on my wallet having to drive, and the parking sucks."
    What is the coolest thing that’s happened to you at SF State?
    "The coolest thing that’s happened to me is the organizations. I’ve joined Hermanos Unidos and La Raza."
  • Jose Leon, 24, Marketing Management

    Are you originally from San Francisco?
    "I was born in Panama. My parents are immigrants, and we came here in 1999."
    What has been your biggest struggle as an immigrant student?
    "Probably adapting to the language barrier when I first came in. I remember going to the ELD and ESL classes. Just adapting the way people do things differently here than in Latin American Countries."
    What are some barriers you’ve had?
    "It was pretty hard, I needed to take things step by step in junior high, high school and now college. It’s a barrier everyday, just getting up is a struggle coming here, trying to pass your classes, going to work, and paying for your tuition it’s pretty expensive. With your parents especially, that's probably the biggest struggle. You don’t want to let them down or disappoint them."
  • Cynthia Munoz, 18, Nursing

    "I commute, but I want to move out, hopefully soon. I haven’t found the right place that I’m looking for yet so I’m still looking around."
    What is your biggest struggle as a commuter?
    "I just get lazy sometimes, but I still come to school everyday so it doesn’t get in the way."
  • Sherilyn Trach, 18, Cell and Molecular Biology

    Are you in a sorority?
    "Fraternity actually. It’s a co-ed service fraternity and we just do community service. We meet lots of people from other schools. While we’re doing all that community service and social events we like to help other students refine and develop more leadership skills."
    What’s your favorite thing about the fraternity?
    "I really love the people, I love how outgoing and open and everybody is. Everybody is welcome, nobody will be shunned because of who they are. That’s what I really like, everybody is safe."
  • Donna Soutar, 25, Art Education

    What do you want to do after you graduate?
    "Teach, so I’m going to get my credentials in SoCal, substitute while I do that, and then I will go to grad school while I teach."
    What is your favorite thing about SF State?
    "How tight knit the art department is."
  • Kath Olivares, 20, Anthropology

    "I just came back from a journey, I’m kind of tired."
  • Ipek Akin, 22, Sociology and Psycology

    "I like the city very much, it has really different dynamics."

15 Songs To Rejuvenate Your iPod

By Rhys Robinson

Are you tired of the music on your iPod? We’ve all been there. Sometime we reach a point where every song we own seems boring, overplayed and uninspiring. In those moments of crisis, we rummage through Pandora or YouTube for something to reinvigorate and excite us. Such tactics have middling results. But fear not, music lovers. Here are 15 songs to rejuvenate your iPod and get you grooving again. The aim of this piece was to select tunes you may be unfamiliar with, as I feel most of the songs on here often get overlooked. So without further ado, sit back, relax, spark a J and enjoy the tracks.

10811172665_7a884f86fb_b_d

Summer Ignites Winter

By Xpress Mag Staff

Summer Fenton, Olympic hopeful and SF State Biology major, is on her way to the pre-qualifying round in Colorado

Summer Fenton, Olympic hopeful and SF State Biology major, is on her way to the pre-qualifying round in Colorado. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

Words and Photos by Mike Hendrickson

Summer Fenton began snowboarding when she was four years old.  By age six she was competing and had picked up her first sponsorship.

When Mammoth Mountain opened November 7th, a month earlier than the slopes in Tahoe, Fenton was among the first groups of boarders who rode the chairlifts to the top.  With winter fast approaching, Fenton is hitting the slopes in anticipation for the Olympic trials in Colorado this month.

“I want to feel how Olympians feel, I want to feel the honor and feel the competitiveness, the adrenaline, and I want to represent my country,” Fenton says.

Currently, Fenton is ranked in the top-ten nationally for women’s halfpipe competitions.  She hopes to be one of three to represent the United States in the 2014 Winter Olympics this February in Sochi, Russia.

When the nineteen-year-old biology major at SF State found out last July that she was invited to the pre-qualifying competitions in Colorado, Fenton said that it provided some extra motivation.

“I needed to get on my snowboard so bad, I’ve been really hungry to go. I hadn’t snowboarded since July in Oregon. I wish I was snowboarding right now actually. It was nice to be back in my environment and I felt at bliss.”

Summer spends California’s many powderless months in workout sessions with her personal trainer. Every other day she spends two-to-three hour sessions running up sand dunes, spending time on a balance, beam or just general core strengthening.

Two years ago, Fenton suffered a head injury that cost her the season. Despite the setback, she looked ahead seeing the positives that came from the situation.

“Last year I basically had to start from the bottom and work my way up to the top, so last year was a big comeback year for me.  It ended up working out well because I did end up qualifying for the Olympic trials.”

She won the Burton US Open qualifiers which lead to being invited to one of the biggest snowboarding competitions in the nation.

“I think it’s anybody’s game and whoever stomps a run will be the winner.”

Winter is coming, and Fenton plans on being that winner.

  • Fenton is a top-ten ranked competitor in the women's halfpipe and is invited to compete in the olympic trials in Colorado this December. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

    Fenton is a top-ten ranked competitor in the women's halfpipe and is invited to compete in the olympic trials in Colorado this December. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

  • Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

    Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

  • loosens her snow boots after a day on the slopes during opening weekend at Mammoth Mountain Ski Area. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

    Fenton loosens her snow boots after a day on the slopes during opening weekend at Mammoth Mountain Ski Area. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

  • Summer Fenton rides the bowl at Balboa Skatepark, San Francisco, Calif. When she's not able to practice in the snow, Fenton uses other board sports such as skateboarding and surfing to help her prepare.  Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

    Summer Fenton rides the bowl at Balboa Skatepark, San Francisco, Calif. When she's not able to practice in the snow, Fenton uses other board sports such as skateboarding and surfing to help her prepare. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

  • Fenton keeps balance while holding up one leg on the balancing beam. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

    Fenton keeps balance while holding up one leg on the balancing beam. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

  • does exercises with leg bands and weights at Lake Merced in San Francisco, Calif. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

    Fenton does exercises with leg bands and weights at Lake Merced in San Francisco, Calif. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

  • Fenton keeps balance while her personal trainer provides resistance during a training session at Lake Merced. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

    Fenton keeps balance while her personal trainer provides resistance during a training session at Lake Merced. Photo by Mike Hendrickson / Xpress

© Golden Gate XPress Magazine   Log in