Posts Tagged ‘haley brucato’

Michael Swaine mends clothing of locals in the Tenderloin National Forest the afternoon of April 15, 2012. Swaine comes out once a month and offers his services to mend clothing for anyone who needs it. Photo by Gil Riego Jr.

Mending Hearts: A Sewing Project

By xpressmagazine

Michael Swaine mends clothing of locals in the Tenderloin National Forest the afternoon of April 15, 2012. Swaine comes out once a month and offers his services to mend clothing for anyone who needs it. Photo by Gil Riego Jr.

Written by Haley Brucato
Photos by Gil Riego Jr.

Michael Swaine sits behind an unusual looking cart in the middle of the sidewalk, as he mends clothing for free every month in a district of San Francisco that needs the most mending of all: the Tenderloin. With his brightly striped sweater that hangs loosely over a neon green shirt and brown pants, his artsy persona shines through kind eyes that hide behind long grayish brown hair and an unshaven beard. Not only is his style quirky, but so is his wooden cart on wheels. It is complete with a vintage sewing machine attached precariously to the top, while a growing pile of jeans, shirts, sweaters and jackets hang over the edge, and await his expertise.

The 40-year-old mends for the people on the 15th of every month – his cart has a permanent home in the crime ridden neighborhood.

“My friend Manna and I were walking around and we saw an old, empty lot,” recounts Swaine. “She asked me if I could do anything I wanted in that empty lot, what would it be? And so I told her, I’d stick my old sewing machine in the center of it and mend things for people.”

His pride and joy – a century-old sewing machine – was left on the side of Grove street and rescued by Swaine, it was soon brought back to life. With money earned from an art show at The Luggage Store, a non-profit artist run multidisciplinary arts organization, Swaine bought wheelbarrow wheels and built his trademark wooden cart.

KELSEY DREW HALE, JUNIOR AT SFSU, SHOWS OFF A HEAD TO TOE VINTAGE OUTFIT AT DOLORES PARK. WHAT SHE’S WEARING: PINK/ORANGE FLOWERED JONES NEW YORK SPORT BUTTON-UP BLOUSE. PRICE: $3.50. STUDDED COTTON DRAW STRING ARMY JACKET. PRICE: $5.99. GOODWILL 2400 IRVING STREET. PHOTO BY JULIANA SEVERE.

Thriftlation: Trash or Treasure?

By xpressmagazine

KELSEY DREW HALE, JUNIOR AT SFSU, SHOWS OFF A HEAD TO TOE VINTAGE OUTFIT AT DOLORES PARK. WHAT SHE’S WEARING: PINK/ORANGE FLOWERED JONES NEW YORK SPORT BUTTON-UP BLOUSE. PRICE: $3.50. STRETCHY RAYON AND POLYESTER BLACK EXPRESS MAXI SKIRT. PRICE: $2.99. ITEMS ARE FROM SALVATION ARMY AT 1500 VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. PHOTO BY JULIANA SEVERE.

Written by Haley Brucato
Photos by Juliana Severe

The familiar smell of musty furniture wafts through aisles of old books, dusty knick knacks, and faded jeans. Although these items are one person’s trash, they will soon become another’s treasure. The thrill of hunting for vintage items buried in the back of Grandma’s closet for all those years bring shoppers to thrift stores day after day, and keeps businesses thriving and growing all over San Francisco.

Whether it be a fashionista innovator on the hunt for some inspiration, or a single mom as she searches for affordable clothing for her growing child, used goods stores offer something for everyone. The unexpected surprises that await can allow many customers to truly define their personal style choices with articles from all decades, which fuel the power of recycling and repurposing.

With the quirky and eccentric street style that is associated with modern and chic young adults, thrift stores are experiencing a recent spike in popularity and price inflation. Because of this, people truly in need who can’t afford new clothes, have to compete with bargain hunters and antique dealers who don’t mind paying the higher prices. Used sweaters that were previously marked at $3 can now be found for as much as $10, almost reaching the same price as new items from popular clothing stores like Forever 21.

SF State Students Weigh in on Truths Behind Juice Cleanse Fad

By xpressmagazine

SB_Juicing_2_20_2012-0000

Aleeza Brown plays around with the all natural ingredients that will go into her juice, Feb. 19. Photo by Sam Battles

Written by Haley Brucato

@hbrucato

Bags of fresh fruits and vegetables line the steel counter tops in a cramped college apartment. The vibrant colors provide a stark contrast to the habitual empty Seniore’s pizza boxes and abandoned Quickly’s cups usually lining the corner of the kitchen. The group of students work together in a line, and pass down dozens of tomatoes, apples, oranges, carrots and heads of broccoli methodically. One pony-tailed girl rinses at the sink, while a small, muscular male brushes the hair from his eyes and begins slicing quickly, halving a pear, chopping zucchinis and stacking up eggplants, forming a teetering tower of produce.

 A motor suddenly hums to life in the background, whirring in rotation, ready to swallow anything that gets thrown in its mouth. A young student begins shoving things in the opening, and expertly pushes everything in reach through the top. Juice slowly drips out of the spout. First red, then orange and green -The food creates a liquid rainbow. This frothy concoction will be dinner. Grumbling stomachs eagerly await the tomato shot for dessert – though their taste buds beg to differ. These five SF State students will repeat this process more than three times a day for about ten days.

Juice cleanses are all the craze right now, evident from the well publicized celebrity detoxes, and the recent growing popularity and inspiration stemming from Joe Cross’ documentary film, “Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead,” in which Cross takes on a 60-day cleanse to transform his health and successfully rid himself of an impairing skin disease. With independent juice bars beginning to pop up all across the country, this fad is quickly becoming mainstream. Angela Trinh, owner of PowerSource Cafe and juice bar, has seen a recent spike in popularity of her fresh squeezed juices.

For the cleanse, fruits and vegetables will be freshly juiced multiple times a day, and replace solid food for three, five or even ten-days. And the biggest catch – no alcohol, no caffeine, no nicotine. Not exactly an easy feat for a group of college students whose bodies are accustomed to ingesting those three detriments on a regular basis.

healthyeatingbanner

Life Beyond Takeout

By xpressmagazine

Written by Haley Brucato Photos by Nelson Estrada

@hbrucato 

Constant snacks for late night study sessions and a quick slice after a night at the bar can easily be the cause of steady weight gain in college. It’s time to stop using money as an excuse for daily junk eating. Low-cost healthy alternatives are out there, and easily accessible for on-the-go students who balance work, internships, classes and a social life.

When students find themselves  constantly saying “Tomorrow is time to eat healthier and finally lose this weight,” but can’t resist the urges, it’s time to consider other options. Physical and mental health won’t improve unless students truly start paying attention to their nutritional habits.

Ashley Hathaway, a certified nutritional therapist and Gut and Psychology Syndrome practitioner in San Francisco, believes that students on a tight budget are still capable of buying nutritional foods that won’t break the bank. Hathaway stresses that the budget conscious focus on quality versus quantity. Many students tend to grab things that are immediately satisfying to eat in the moment, like a donut or cup of coffee in the morning, but, according to Hathaway, they are only putting their money towards empty calories.

“They get a jolt from that,” explains Hathaway. “But later get quickly hungry because the body hasn’t truly been nourished.”

© Golden Gate XPress Magazine   Log in